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Fish Girl, de David Wiesner (texte et dessin) et Donna Jo Napoli (texte) – Clarion Books, 2017.

Who is Fish Girl? What is Fish Girl? She lives in a tank in a boardwalk aquarium. She is the main attraction, though visitors never get more than a glimpse of her. She has a tail. She can’t walk. She can’t speak. But she can make friends with Livia, an ordinary girl, and yearn for a life that includes yoga and pizza. She can grow stronger and braver. With determination, a touch of magic, and the help of a loyal octopus, she can do anything.

Mettez-moi un livre de David Wiesner entre les mains et je suis déjà ailleurs, loin, loin, très loin. C’est toujours un voyage particulier. Cet auteur/illustrateur a une telle imagination ! J’ai été totalement emportée par cette fabuleuse histoire, par cette soif de liberté et d’indépendance qui grandit chaque jour en Mira. A lire absolument !

Drama, de Raina Telgemeier – Scholastic, 2012.

 

Callie loves theater. And while she would totally try out for her middle school’s production of Moon Over Mississippi, she can’t really sing. Instead she’s the set designer for the drama department stage crew, and this year she’s determined to create a set worthy of Broadway on a middle-school budget. But how can she, when she doesn’t know much about carpentry, ticket sales are down, and the crew members are having trouble working together? Not to mention the onstage AND offstage drama that occurs once the actors are chosen. And when two cute brothers enter the picture, things get even crazier!

J’ai retrouvé avec plaisir le dessin de Raina Telgemeier. L’intrigue est sympathique, les personnages assez attachants, et on suit avec un certain plaisir la création de cette pièce de théâtre.

The Colour of Milk, de Nell Leyshon – Ecco, 2013.

Mary and her three sisters rise every day to backbreaking farm work that threatens to suppress their own awakening desires, whether it’s Violet’s pull toward womanhood or Beatrice’s affinity for the Scriptures. But it’s their father, whose anger is unleashed at the slightest provocation, who stands to deliver the most harm. Only Mary, fierce of tongue and a spitfire since birth, dares to stand up to him. When he sends her to work for the local vicar and his invalid wife in their house on the hill, he deals her the only blow she may not survive. Within walking distance of her own family farm, the vicarage is a world away-a curious, unsettling place unlike any she has known. Teeming with the sexuality of the vicar’s young son and the manipulations of another servant, it is also a place of books and learning-a source of endless joy. Yet as young Mary soon discovers, such precious knowledge comes with a devastating price as it is made gradually clear once she begins the task of telling her own story. Reminiscent of Alias Grace in the exploration of the power dynamics between servants and those they serve and The Color Purple‘s Celie, The Colour of Milk is a quietly devastating tour de force that reminds us that knowledge can destroy even as it empowers.

Après avoir eu besoin d’un certain temps pour m’habituer à cette écriture difficile, brute, sans majuscules, répétitive, et parfois volontairement « incorrecte », j’ai été entrainée dans cette histoire, une histoire très particulière, d’une noirceur certaine. J’ai été très émue par le témoignage bouleversant de Mary, et c’est avec regret que j’ai dû quitter ce personnage fort attachant en finissant ce court roman.

Ragdoll, de Daniel Cole – Ecco, avril 2017.

William Fawkes, a controversial detective known as The Wolf, has just been reinstated to his post after months of psychological assessment following allegations of a shocking assault. A veteran of the force, Fawkes thinks he’s seen it all. That is, until his former partner and friend, Detective Emily Baxter, calls him to a crime scene and leads him to a career-defining cadaver: the dismembered parts of six victims sewn together like a puppet – a corpse that becomes known in the press as the « ragdoll. » Fawkes is tasked with identifying the six victims, but that gets dicey when his reporter ex-wife anonymously receives photographs from the crime scene, along with a list of six names, and the dates on which the Ragdoll Killer plans to murder them. The final name on the list is Fawkes. Baxter and her trainee partner, Alex Edmunds, hone in on figuring out what links the victims together before the killer strikes again. But for Fawkes, seeing his name on the list sparks a dark memory, and he fears that the catalyst for these killings has more to do with him – and his past – than anyone realises.

Dès les premières pages, on est emporté dans ce roman qui nous offre une enquête riche. Les personnages sont savoureusement complexes (mention spéciale pour Wolf !), mais pas autant que l’intrigue, qui peine parfois dans un rythme un peu trop ralenti à mon goût, comme un début prometteur qui se meurt et qui m’a lassé. Je suis un peu déçue par cette lecture dont j’attendais bien plus après avoir lu de nombreuses critiques dithyrambiques. Un bon premier roman tout de même !

Giant Days #1, de John Allison (texte), Lissa Treiman (dessin), Whitney Cogar (couleurs) – BOOM! Box, 2015.

 

Susan, Esther, and Daisy started at university three weeks ago and became fast friends. Now, away from home for the first time, all three want to reinvent themselves. But in the face of handwringing boys, “personal experimentation,” influenza, mystery-mold, nu-chauvinism, and the willful, unwanted intrusion of “academia,” they may be lucky just to make it to spring alive. Going off to university is always a time of change and growth, but for Esther, Susan, and Daisy, things are about to get a little weird.

J’ai plus que moyennement apprécié ce comics, que ce soit pour son histoire, son dessin et sa colorisation. Je ne lirai pas les autres volumes.

Persepolis (#1) : the Story of a Childhood, de Marjane Satrapi – Pantheon, 2003.

Wise, funny, and heartbreaking, Persepolis is Marjane Satrapi’s memoir of growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. In powerful black-and-white comic strip images, Satrapi tells the story of her life in Tehran from ages six to fourteen, years that saw the overthrow of the Shah’s regime, the triumph of the Islamic Revolution, and the devastating effects of war with Iraq. The intelligent and outspoken only child of committed Marxists and the great-granddaughter of one of Iran’s last emperors, Marjane bears witness to a childhood uniquely entwined with the history of her country. Persepolis paints an unforgettable portrait of daily life in Iran and of the bewildering contradictions between home life and public life. Marjane’s child’s-eye view of dethroned emperors, state-sanctioned whippings, and heroes of the revolution allows us to learn as she does the history of this fascinating country and of her own extraordinary family. Intensely personal, profoundly political, and wholly original, Persepolis is at once a story of growing up and a reminder of the human cost of war and political repression. It shows how we carry on, with laughter and tears, in the face of absurdity. And, finally, it introduces us to an irresistible little girl with whom we cannot help but fall in love.

Ce roman graphique, racontant l’enfance de l’auteur dans un Iran violent et instable, est saisissant, intense, magnifique, touchant, mais aussi instructif. L’Histoire en planches noires et blanches ! Cette petite Marji est incroyable et forte. J’ai très envie de découvrir la suite de cette vie singulière.

Sunny Side Up, de Jennifer L. Holm & Matthew Holm – Scholastic, 2015.

Sunny Lewin has been packed off to Florida to live with her grandfather for the summer. At first she thought Florida might be fun — it is the home of Disney World, after all. But the place where Gramps lives is no amusement park. It’s full of . . . old people. Really old people. Luckily, Sunny isn’t the only kid around. She meets Buzz, a boy who is completely obsessed with comic books, and soon they’re having adventures of their own: facing off against golfball-eating alligators, runaway cats, and mysteriously disappearing neighbors. But the question remains — why is Sunny down in Florida in the first place? The answer lies in a family secret that won’t be secret to Sunny much longer. . .

Un roman graphique aux planches pas très agréables à regarder, mais qui porte une histoire forte. Sunny, éloignée par ses parents de son frère qui doit résoudre son problème d’addiction aux drogues, se retrouve quelque temps chez son grand-père, lequel vit dans un petit appartement au sein d’une communauté pour retraités. Au début, les relations ne sont pas toujours évidentes, mais au fil des jours, le lien familial s’installe vraiment. Grâce aux flashbacks, on comprend mieux ce que ressent Sunny depuis longtemps face à la situation de son frère, et vivre ainsi loin de lui va lui permettre de mieux se comprendre, d’accepter et de dire enfin ce qu’elle a sur le coeur. Une histoire touchante qui évoque habilement ce que peut ressentir l’entourage proche d’une personne qui se drogue.

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